The Peregrine Fund Home
Sign In
The Peregrine Fund Notes From The Field

"Notes from the Field" provides frequent updates and pictures from our biologists and students who are working in the field or at our headquarters, the World Center for Birds of Prey.

•  Complete Philippine Eagle data on GRIN

Found 8 entries matching your request:

Luzon’s first satellite tagged eagle ‘Raquel’ finally seen again in northern Sierra Madre Mountains

Jayson C. Ibanez — in Philippine Eagle Conservation

More than three years after Philippine Eagle ‘Raquel’ was last seen a team of Philippine Eagle Foundation (PEF) biologists and localtrail masters got a rare glimpse of the dispersing eagle well within the thick jungles of the Sierra Madre mountain ranges.

Read more...

Find more articles about Philippine Eagle, Asia-Pacific


Rare and critically endangered Philippine Eagle found in Apayao

Jayson C. Ibanez — in Philippine Eagle Conservation

A pair and an offspring of the mighty Philippine Eagle Pithecophaga jefferyi, one of the world’s rarest and most endangered “birds-of-prey”, were confirmed by a composite team of investigators from the Philippine Eagle Foundation (PEF), DENR, and the San Roque Power Corporation Foundation during a 2-week expedition that began November 6, 2011 at Calanasan Town in Apayao Province.

Read more...

Find more articles about Philippine Eagle, Asia-Pacific


KALUMBATA soars across Mt Kitanglad

Jayson C. Ibanez — in Philippine Eagle Conservation

“MAYA” - referring to the diminutive, non-native bird of grasslands and rice fields whose scientific (latin) name is Lonchura malacca- was the reply of a farmer when asked what the country’s national bird is (though it was, until it got replaced by the giant and native Philippine Eagle in 1995). In one of Mt. Kitanglad’s remote elementary schools, a group of kids responded with a blank stare.

Read more...

Find more articles about Philippine Eagle, Asia-Pacific


Chick #24 Hatches at Philippine Eagle Center

Jayson C. Ibanez — in Philippine Eagle Conservation

The following is a press release sent by Tatit Quiblat of the Philippine Eagle Center

Read more...

Find more articles about Philippine Eagle, Asia-Pacific


A pioneer case of releasing a young Philippine Eagle succeeds

Jayson C. Ibanez — in Philippine Eagle Conservation

After nearly two months of not exactly knowing how well the released young Philippine Eagle “Hagpa” is doing back at its forest home in Impasug-ong, Bukidnon, the Philippine Eagle Foundation (PEF) finally confirmed that the parent eagles have accepted the eaglet back and are feeding the young bird.

Read more...

Find more articles about Philippine Eagle, Asia-Pacific


Philippine eagle rehabilitation and release: a case succeeds

Jayson C. Ibanez — in Philippine Eagle Conservation

Sick, dehydrated, starving. These gloomy images entered conversations at the Philippine Eagle Center whenever office staff asked for updates about Kalabugao, a young female eagle released inside Mount Kitanglad Natural Park in Bukidnon in October 2009. For several months, the field crew did not see the eagle in the wild.

Read more...

Find more articles about Philippine Eagle, Asia-Pacific


Update on the Harpy Eagle Captive Breeding Program

Saskia Santamaria — in Harpy Eagle Conservation and Research

Harpy Eagles usually lay a clutch of two eggs, and although both may hatch, usually only one chick survives to fledge. Once fledged, the juvenile may stay with its parents for a period of up to two or three years while it learns to hunt and care for itself. Once the young becomes independent and starts looking for its own mate and territory the adults are able to attempt breeding again. This long interval between breeding attempts and resulting slow rate of reproduction makes the species extremely vulnerable to direct human impact, such as persecution (shooting and trapping), long before deforestation destroys their habitat.

Read more...

Find more articles about Harpy Eagle, Philippine Eagle, Neotropics


November 1999

Bill Burnham — in Mongolia Project

Day One - Rob’s wife Tara, with 10-month-old Will, who had an ear infection and was running a fever, held in her arms and four-year-old Jackson tugging at her pant leg, waved a smiling goodbye as Rob and I bolted down the jet way. Although sad to see him leave, having the whirlwind of activities preceding his departure over was probably also a relief to her. We were the last two on board and somewhat sheepishly hurried to our seats as the plane door was closed by an understandably grumpy flight attendant. The adventure finally had begun!

Read more...

Find more articles about Harpy Eagle, Philippine Eagle, Asia-Pacific


Most Recent Entries Atom feedshow-hide

Our Authorsshow-hide

Our Conservation Projectsshow-hide

Species we work withshow-hide

Where we workshow-hide

Unknown column 'Hits' in 'field list'
Support our work - Donate